(Source: neptunain, via cum-onfeelthe-noiz)

@11 hours ago with 32849 notes

levi-in-wonderland:

princedoki:

hey kid wanna buy some white haired anime boys

No they expire too early

(via sunnysunshine4u)

@11 hours ago with 31653 notes

They’re BABIES

(Source: lilypoters, via liamdryden)

@1 day ago with 23534 notes

huffingtonpost:

DEBI JACKSON, MOTHER OF TRANSGENDER CHILD, GIVES MOVING SPEECH

The best part of the video may be when Jackson addresses the comments she’s heard about her daughter and sets the record straight about statements like you “wanted a girl so you turned your child into one” and “kids have no idea what they want or who they are — my kids wants to be a dog, should I let him?”

So watch the full video to see her answers to those difficult questions here.

(via penicillium-pusher)

@1 day ago with 25038 notes

melkior:

send hELP

(via noniway)

@1 day ago with 81284 notes

(Source: sandandglass, via thergood)

@11 hours ago with 994 notes

xbox420:

jerry accidentally walked into someone elses interview so he backtracked and pulled out his phone and just scrolled through it in the middle of the red carpet

goddammit jerry

(via thergood)

@1 day ago with 18384 notes

fartgallery:

readingaroundthemovies:

fartgallery:

i need to date a girl with the initials AG so we can carve SW+AG on benches

Those r my mums initials…,

say hello to your new dad. i see that your tumblr blog contains some vulgar language. you’re grounded

(via sunnysunshine4u)

@1 day ago with 139795 notes

fishingboatproceeds:

So how do communities with limited electricity and running water in Ethiopia reduce infant mortality and dramatically improve newborn and maternal health? 
With a system designed by Ethiopians for Ethiopia, and a lot of amazingly dedicated health extension workers and volunteers. (The tier system is explained in the first picture.) I’m obviously no expert, but from what I could tell the nonprofit funding worked precisely because it was helping people execute their vision, rather than trying to impose a strategy upon them.
Today, I visited a health center and then a health outpost, a small structure with no electricity serving a community of around 5,000. The Outpost (picture two) was staffed by two women who can do everything from treat malaria to deliver babies. They have a detailed and systematic approach (those files in picture three contain information about every family in their area), but they rely on the volunteer Women’s Health Care Army to provide education, prenatal care, and family planning assistance, among many other things, to every family in the area.
It was fascinating to start my journey at a facility that can do Caesarean sections and then follow the health care system into individual residences, where a woman can talk directly to someone she trusts about prenatal vitamins, contraception, and breastfeeding. 
The health challenges here in Ethiopia are massive, obviously, but these volunteers are a big part of the reason that Ethiopia’s infant and maternal mortality rates are dropping so dramatically.
You’ll meet several of them in a forthcoming video, but I just wanted to share the amazingness of today’s experience.

(via edwardspoonhands)

@1 day ago with 7334 notes
smitethepatriarchy:

greenthepress:

smartercities:

Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany
The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

She is the future

Ever notice how it’s always brilliant teenagers making stuff that will actually solve the world’s worst problems, like what do adults even do?

smitethepatriarchy:

greenthepress:

smartercities:

Meet The 14-Year-Old Girl Who Developed A Low-Cost Water Purification System | FastCompany

The next generation of scientists is already hard at work solving our biggest problems. Take Deepika Kurup, a 14-year-old high school student from Nashua, New Hampshire. After seeing children in India drinking dirty water from a stagnant pool, she decided, in her words, “to find a solution to the global water crisis.” And then she actually made some progress towards that goal, developing a solar-powered water purification system.

She is the future

Ever notice how it’s always brilliant teenagers making stuff that will actually solve the world’s worst problems, like what do adults even do?

(via snake-mama)

@2 days ago with 7893 notes